Carrot Juice or Chemo?

They say there are two things you should never talk about at the dinner table: politics and religion.  I beg to differ.  I’d argue that food has become almost as controversial as politics or religion.  Think of all the nutrition information out there, and how confusing it is, yet everyone has a strong point of view on the subject:  Lean meat protein is good. No, meat is bad.   If you know where your meat comes from, it’s ok to eat it.  No, plant based protein is the only healthy option.  Fish is healthy. Fish is toxic, etc.  Then, there are the confusing terms and labels like farm raised, free-range, grass fed, omega 3 added, organic, fortified, ‘natural’, and on and on and on …

I have gluten sensitivity (celiac), which can be tricky in a social environment.  Although I always try to be subtle when asking the server for gluten-free options, I inevitably end up in a conversation about gluten.  People always like to know how it affects you.  Well, if you look up the main symptoms, it doesn’t exactly make pleasant dinner conversation.  For me, it was throwing up.   Yackity-yak-yacking after gluten-filled meals.  Mostly, people get BAD gas.  I’m not talking garden-variety gas; I’m talking peel the paint off the walls, asphyxiating green gas bombs!  Do you still want to know the symptoms?  The worst affect is the villi in your stomach lining get damaged and lie flat, which doesn’t allow proper absorption of vitamins and minerals.  This can lead to a host of other ailments, including fibromyalgia which I suffer from.

Since I’m not a big pill-taker, I prefer to find natural alternatives whenever possible.  This has led me to have a fascination with the link between food and wellness.  I’ve done some research on various therapies including The China Study, which is a plant-based vegetarian diet said to reverse heart disease and cancer.  The Gerson Therapy, a very controversial cancer therapy that involves heavy juicing, coffee enemas and the like.  I’ve also looked into Ayurveda, veganism acupuncture, etc.  I’m not endorsing or following any particular protocol, but I like learning about different approaches.

At our house, we strive (don’t always succeed) to eat organic and local products, within the balance of a fast-paced lifestyle, and a love of good restaurants and eating out.  Yes, that means we eat fast food sometimes.  I’ve had great success with keeping my symptoms at bay when I’m eating well.  This means clean, mostly organic whole foods.  However, I’m not doing so well with that this year and wow, can I tell the difference!

So … when Lulu was diagnosed with cancer, it made me question a lot of things including the food she eats.  She’s a notoriously picky eater, and has battled our food choices since I can remember.  I’m sure having an undiagnosed infected appendix affected her digestion as well.  I’m sure it wasn’t any one thing, but I’d like to try control the elements I can to help her heal.

That being said, people have suggested we try some alternative therapies including heavy vitamin therapy, juicing, and even ingesting silver as of recent.  I like my alternative therapies to have science backing them up, but with the amount of free-floating information out there, it’s more than confusing.  What I know for sure is that Lulu’s cancer was so fast moving there was NO WAY we would ever consider an alternative therapy.  If we hadn’t gotten her started on chemo immediately, she wouldn’t be here today.  Within a week after diagnosis, her bone marrow had been so overloaded with leukemic blasts that she couldn’t walk and was in extreme pain.  Do I wish I could give her some carrot juice and a coffee enema to cure her?  YES!  But the science simply isn’t there.  Do I hate giving her toxic medication every single day that may cause long-term harm to her?  YES!  Do I worry she won’t be able to conceive?   That her OCD is mostly caused by the drugs?  That she may never be the same little girl we had before?  You guessed it, yep.  It’s awful feeling like you are poisoning your own child with the very thing that is saving them, knowing there is no alternative to treat her.  Aside from horrifying cancer itself, it’s devastating to see children die from the side effects of the drugs, not the disease.

What I hope for the future of medicine is that we can help fund studies to incorporate some less toxic alternatives into cancer treatment.  Nutrition related or not.  It’s not simple, it’s tragically difficult, and I truly believe in the sincerity of our caregivers. I’m not preaching, but I am wishing, hoping and believing.

We’ve been honored to find some brilliant scientists right here in our own state that are doing just that.  Yesterday, we donated the $3000 from Lulu’s lemon-aid stands to The Blood Research Institute.  They are on the brink of a huge discovery, which could make enormous strides towards a cure, and in reducing toxins during treatment.  We know that our donation is small compared to what they need, but we hope it will inspire others to do the same.  With kids like Lulu (Love 4 Lulu), Bo (Go Bo Foundation) our new friend Emma Rose (Emma Rose, A patient Helping Patients) and others, these gestures can add up to some real change.

Who knows, maybe in the near future we will take our chemo with a carrot juice chaser?

Love,

a.l.l. of us

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