Jazz Hands

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(pic from a.m. rehearsal)

“Begin doing what you want to do now. We are not living in eternity. We have only this moment, sparkling like a star in our hand – and melting like a snowflake. Let us use it before it is too late.” – Marie Beynon Ray

Life has been opening up again. Personally, I feel like a canary that’s been let out of her cage. Hope is now blossoming into full-on optimism. Although we have 13 more months of treatment, I think we are all starting to live in a new way; unapologetically and unabashedly … squeezing the joy out of every plausible moment. This is what can happen when you almost lose life, and witness loss. There is a renewed appreciation for all things good, whether big or small.

We had an incredible experience last week, when the four of us appeared as guest speakers at a convention in Palm Springs. We added a few days to the beginning of the trip to spend much needed time together as a family. The warmth and sunshine were like happy-juice to us! The resort was everything our lives have not been: perfect, lush, accessible, relaxing, and comfortable. – A soft place to land after a hard day, or in this case, a hard year. We hung out together, swam, walked, played, relaxed, and had some actual downtime. Jimmy and I even sneaked in some quality time (wink, wink!).
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After a couple of days of this, it was time to think about why we were brought there: Jazz Pharmaceuticals. This is the company that had the alternative drug (Erwinase) for Lulu after she had a horrifying allergic reaction to PEG-Asparagenase (see excerpt from Caring Bridge below). They also took a pic of Lulu for their website, which we found out has served as a huge inspiration to their company in its entirety. We met the MC for the event, so full of kinetic energy and persona I thought he was gonna throw a jazz-hand out at any given moment! It was like looking directly into the sun. He was a Broadway actor and we both swore we had met before, perhaps from my performing days. He was at once comforting and startling, reminding us that we had a job to do there.

The four of us were featured at two sessions, the general session with a few hundred people, and a more intimate breakout session with about 50-60 people from the Oncology department. We had a rehearsal the day before, as well as one in the morning with the CEO Bruce, who would interview us on stage.IMG_2539 - Version 2

(pic from tech rehearsal)

The theme was ‘Bringing Value to Life’, and our story would kick start the multi-day event, to set the tone for the rest of the conference. What an honor. I won’t kid you, it was a bit nerve-wracking to speak on stage to that many people, but any nerves I felt in anticipation were totally gone by the time we went on. Jimmy and Max were cool as cucumbers too. Lulu got quite shy right before, and instead of her solo spot, we ended up all going on together. We entered the stage to a standing ovation, and surprised and delighted faces since most of the attendees hadn’t been told she/we would be there. Lulu was asked a few questions about her upcoming Make-a-Wish trip, and what rainbows meant to her, and was whisked off stage so we could get into the tougher subjects.

As those of you who have been reading this blog for a while know, I have a bittersweet relationship with medicine. Our whole family does. Pharmaceuticals are not on the short-list of aspirational adventures, but this company is truly different. The people we’ve met and come to know through Jazz have been consistently sincere, kind and enthusiastic about their work, a rare combination in any field, let-alone pharmacy! We’ve been in contact with multiple employees over these past few months, and developed a great report and, in some cases, a lasting friendship (you know who you are!).

After meeting CEO Bruce Cozadd, I understood why such a unique culture had been created. He shared with us a very personal story about his family, and I feel he has turned a tragedy into a journey, and that journey into a mission through his company. You can feel it in the way his employees speak of him: “Oh, just wait until you meet him, you’ll love him!” “He is so easy to be around, so compassionate”, “He’s such a great guy!” It went on and on and my B.S. detector didn’t go off once! He also admitted things aren’t perfect there (love that honesty) and it was clear he was genuinely concerned about it. After our interview with him, I could see how wonderfully down-to-earth he was, brilliant but humble, and deeply grounded. I also understood how he had developed such an amazing team; like attracts like.

Following the general session, we had a Q&A with the Oncology team. Many of whom have been touched by cancer personally and/or have battled it themselves. The questions were so pertinent, and insightful. Matt, a new friend with a permanent place in our hearts, surprised Jimmy by having the whole team wear Triumph motorcycle t-shirts. Jimmy has been wearing his in honor of Lulu, and Matt thoughtfully remembered this! That initiated the mood as the four of us were ushered on stage. Max continued to steal the show with his old-soul wisdom combined with his cute cheeks, and we all held it together fairly well until I started talking about what Lulu has learned though this. I talked about her generosity, the lemonade stands, and then went into her deepened empathy. She had recently spoken to me about Bo, our friend who lost his battle with cancer and deeply touched our lives. I choked and stopped. After what seemed like an eternity, I continued in this pathetic crying voice to share what Lulu told me last week: “Mama, when people die, they don’t go away forever, they just move into your head” She pointed to her heart on stage and I said “And your heart, right Lulu?” She nodded calmly; relieved I had understood her message. I’m convinced she is connected to the afterlife in a very different way than most of us are. Matt handed me a tissue, and we finished up with Jimmy telling the story of his first father-daughter dance that had happened right there the night before (and that Lulu had asked him!) Well, there wasn’t a dry eye in the house after those two stories.

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The attendees flocked around us after, regaling us with stories of their own, sharing lives they had lost and personal battles fought. I wished we could have talked to each one of them for the rest of the night. I felt so drawn to this work we were doing, so invigorated and energized from it. I long to do more.

So … life is really, really good right now for all of us, relatively speaking. Right now is all that matters. Lulu is sick infrequently, the OCD diminishing through our guidance, but more so through her own sheer will. I’m almost giddy with excitement and relishing every moment. Don’t be surprised if I shoot a jazz hand out your way the next time I see you …

Love,

a.l.l. of us

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Caring Bridge entry from February 11, 2012

Hello,

I write to you today excitedly, to share some great news: Lulu actually ATE yesterday!!! I’m not talking a mouse-like bite out of a cracker, or a single grape. She ate for REAL. The docs gave her an appetite stimulant last week, and it seems to be working. Yesterday, she woke up and told me she wanted pancakes! Of course, she wanted them from Beans and Barley, so I bundled up, shoveled off my car and headed out in the snowstorm. Baby wants pancakes, Baby gets pancakes! Apparently, I missed the breakfast menu by 15 minutes. Argh. I actually pulled out the sympathy card and explained the situation, that my daughter has cancer, hadn’t eaten in over 9 weeks, etc, but to no avail. I think the guy almost thought I was making it up! Dude, your pancakes are good, but not THAT good. So, I headed over to The Original Pancake House to get her second favorites. Success. She was so excited when I got back, and she ate almost 1/2 of one! Then she wanted banana yogurt, some water, her favorite rice puffs, then pretzels. I just could not believe my eyes! She kept it all down and asked for more at dinner. Some baby sweet potatoes and a chocolate cupcake brought over from a good friend. I didn’t care how much sugar, fat, whatever was in anything she ate, she was eating! More this a.m., with yogurt and a pancake. Granted, there were some issues in the middle of the night, but expected with the new stuff coming at her long-empty tummy. Please keep those prayers coming, if this keeps up, we an get her off IV and maybe even tube feeds in the future. :-)!

More good news; her temperament has been almost normal for the last few days. She has 6 days off chemo, and what a difference that makes. I’ve come to understand the multi-faceted and diverse effects drugs can have on children. Each child reacts uniquely, and chemical imbalances are nothing to sneeze at … When she’s in Sybill-mode, there is no amount of good parenting that will change the outcome of her behavior. I can no more control her moods than I can stop a truck from barreling down the highway with my outstretched hands. Again, it gives me empathy for parents with kids with ADHD, ADD, all the levels of autism that can’t be seen with the naked eye, etc. I won’t be so quick to judge that bratty child at the checkout counter, or their parents. Who knows what they’re dealing with, what medications they might be on, or what is going on in their home.

Speaking of medications, I bet you’re wondering about the tornado. Well, we couldn’t let a whole week go by without a little drama, could we! I jest, but it was actually terrifying. On Tuesdays clinic visit, Lulu was scheduled to get a couple of chemo drugs that we don’t give at home. One of which, can cause allergic reactions, so the nurse stays in the room with you. Lulu has gotten this drug a couple times before, so the nurse and I were chatting it up while the med started. Within seconds, things went very, very wrong. Lu started screaming that her tummy was burning and that she felt really sick and awful. A couple seconds later, her entire face turned dark red and she started vomiting profusely and screaming ” HELP ME! PLEEEAAASSE HELP ME!!!”. Her face swelled up, including her eyes, lips, then tongue and throat. Omg. I’m freaking inside but staying calm for her. 4 nurses and 2 doctors are in our room with the kind of calm that’s full of electricity, extreme focus and intention. Lulu glossed over and stopped responding. She went sheet-white. She got IV benadryl, epi-shot, steroids and 2 other drugs. Finally, she became stable and fell asleep. I sat back in my chair and the tears started rolling down my cheeks like a waterfall. Dammit! Can’t she just have a normal week of totally shittty cancer? She had only gotten .9 of 50 units of this med. Thank goodness it wasn’t more. Even after the shot, meds, she started swelling again. Her eyes were super puffy and her lips were full enough to qualify her for an audition for The Real Housewives of Milwaukee. So, more meds were given, and we were checked into the hospital for the night. Obviously, she can’t ever get this medicine again, so now we get the added bonus of going in 6 times instead of one. Thank goodness at least there is an alternative drug. It’s called Erwinase. She will get two shots simultaneously in each leg Mon, Wed, Fri for two weeks. The risks are less with the smaller, more frequent doses, but it will suck seeing her held down, screaming while she gets these “pokes”. Poor baby girl :-(.

Jimmy was on the plane headed to LA during all this fun, and had emailed me with a strong prediction that something was very wrong. At the time, we were having a great day, and I told him all was well. Wow. I hated to tell him how right he was. Worried sick, he carried on and did a fantastic job on his production. He amazes me. Maybe its best he missed it, as I hope to never see anything like that again, and have had nightmares the past few nights over it. Kids make you feel so vulnerable … your love for them is so deep and strong, the mere thought of anything going wrong can make you catch your breath.

A.L.L. ALL of us. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. When one person in the family gets sick, the whole family gets sick, just in different ways. All are effected, even Lulu’s classmates, friends, relatives, ALL feel it’s effects, its burdens, its lessons, its inspiration. There are so many ways Lulu and A.L.L. are teaching us. I’m being more open and honest about this than I ever thought I’d be, feeling strongly drawn to write about it, and share with ALL, in hopes of something good coming out of the bad. I’m soaking up all the lessons for myself, including how to ask for help, taking care of myself, developing deeper empathy, helping others more, remembering true priorities, the list goes on and on. Now don’t go expecting me to be some perfect version of myself, no way Jose Eber! -but I know I will be a better version, and will realize more quickly when I mess up:-).

When I see the letters A.L.L. Now, I’m reframing them to stand for:

A

Luscious

Life

Good will come of this.

Things are getting better. We have 4.5 more months of hard-core treatment then 2 years of maintenance treatment, which is likely easier. I was recently introduced to another parent whose prognosis isn’t as good. His beautiful 10-year-old boy has brain cancer, and after almost a year-long battle, only has 2-4 months to live. I’d like to ask you to pray and send love to Josh Garcia and his family, as there is nothing harder on this earth than this. Also, please pray for Madi Drayna, who is recovering from a serious car accident. Her mother works at Lucia’s school.

I hope for more good reports on our end, and no more tornadoes. Just blue skies and lots and lots of rainbows!

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Highlights (mostly!)

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Hello Friends!

Wow, it’s been a while since my last entry.  Thanks for your patience.  I’ll hit the highlights and lowlights to catch you up to speed.  Luckily, this will contain mostly the former!

We ended up spending the holidays in a much more quiet fashion than anticipated.  We were just too exhausted to make the 6+ hour trek to my BFF’s house.  Staying home turned out to be a fantastic choice.  We just needed some R&R after 2012!   As my grandmother used to say, my get-up and go, got-up and went…  We took the kids to Children’s Hospital Christmas Eve.  I know, you’re thinking: “Really?  You CHOSE to go to the hospital?”  We did.  We were so grateful not to be there, that we figured we’d bring some cheer to those who were, while teaching our kids to give back, and be grateful for all that we have (This does not mean that they were cured of their American spoiled-rottenness, but a step in the right direction nonetheless!).

We saw some of our favorite nurses, and our social worker that introduced us to a family who had been diagnosed only 2 days prior.  All it took was one look into their eyes and I was hugging and crying with the mom, while Jimmy did likewise with the dad.  Their shock, grief and overwhelm was palpable, and all too reminiscent.  I think seeing Lulu there, bouncing up and down like a caffeinated bunny was reassuring to them.  Their 4-year-old son also had a.l.l.  Max and Lulu each gave them the $10 they had received from their “aunt” Carrie, to buy a gift for their son.  It was very tender, and the parents took a picture of our kids in their laps, to show to their son later.

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I’ve gone back to working on more photo shoots, and after a rough first day, felt back in the swing again.  The first day was just tough because I had to return to the ‘scene of the crime’, in a way …  I went back to the photo studio where I found out Lulu had cancer, and it was much more difficult than I had anticipated.  I was actually shaking as I drove there, and couldn’t even walk past the station where I had learned the life-changing news.  Ugh.  I was lucky to work with some wonderful models and crew though, and one photographer even brought me a beautiful bouquet of flowers to welcome me back.  That gesture was really big for me somehow.

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After that week, I spent left on my first work trip in over a year.  I went to NYC to work with a new crew, with the exception of my art director/friend.  It ended up being the perfect trip, with a fantastic crew who dressed up every day including a pajama day, hip-hop day (see above – I’m so gangsta, ha!), and pirate day!  Who does that?!?  We all hit it off and ended up going out the last night and having a lot more fun than my head would have asked for the next morning :-).  Oh, and my friend and I even caught a show!  We saw Chicago, and it was her first big show ever.  I swear I had more fun watching her delight than I did the performances!  There’s nothing like your first Broadway show.  She went from 36 to 6-years old as she sat on the edge of her seat, her hands moving from her open mouth to her heart over and over again.

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Lulu missed Mommy lots, but got through the week well.  I was so relieved.  It was very difficult to leave, but it was also much needed time for me to be … me again.

I entered a whirlwind upon my return as we prepared to have a film crew to our house the next day.  Do you remember the poster Lulu was in for Jazz Pharmaceuticals?  After meeting with them, they asked us if we’d be interested in doing more education with them.  They are the company that had the alternative drug to PEG-asparagenase, the drug Lulu almost died from when she had an allergic reaction to it.  We are glad there are companies out there who are looking for alternative and solutions to problems like these, and were happy to work with them.   I can’t say that about every drug company, but they really have a culture of integrity that has been consistent in every person we’ve met there.

They spent about 6 hours interviewing us, and made us feel very comfortable while discussing difficult topics; not an easy job.  Jimmy and I went first while the kids were in another room, then Lulu went solo and didn’t want to perform.  She was so shy you could barely hear her, which cracked me up because she is usually so loud and boisterous!  We all made sure the questions weren’t too pointed for her, as we really don’t want her to recall all the detailed horrors of her journey.  Max had the final interview, and of course nailed it.  That kid!  He answered the questions in his wise-old-young man way.  It was actually good for us to hear him sum things up and know his understanding even surpassed what we thought he comprehended.

More good news!  We will be flying to Palm Springs to speak at the National Sales Convention for Jazz Pharma.  The four of us will be featured on stage as well as in a break-out room for more in-depth q&a.  They want their company to see real faces of cancer, to keep what they do in tangible perspective.  I think we will serve as both a warning and an inspiration.  As we discussed during the taping, we never thought this would be our story, but cancer is indiscriminate.  We feel honored to participate in this way, and feel strongly about raising awareness about childhood cancer.

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This leads me to the lowlight portion of my entry.  Jimmy’s mother recently underwent two back surgeries, finding out shortly after, that he leg had broken just below the hip.  She had another surgery with pins and screws to fuse her leg back together.  She is recovering, but still in tremendous pain and we appreciate any good juju, thoughts and prayers you might send her way.  Her name is Sharon.

Overall, life is feeling hopeful again.  Jimmy is off on a work trip; Lulu is home with a cold, but nothing more.  Hopeful … for the first time in a long time.   I’m trying to stay in the moments, and feel them fully.  I’m doing my best not to think about the last year too much, or the fears of the future.   I’m remembering my previous entry on this topic:

Sit in the moments like a jazz musician sits in the pocket, never before or after the beat, behind or ahead of it.  Enjoy the sweetness of each note as it plays out.

Did I just quote myself?  What a dork.

Love,

a.l.l. of us

 IMG_2322 Oh, Mom …

An eventful day

Yesterday turned out to be an eventful day.  I got a phone call from my Dad, who had gone back home for a while.  He told us his wife’s granddaughter, Kaylee, had been severely burned in a campfire accident.  Apparently, one of the kids at the bonfire had thrown a large log onto the fire, which in turn threw a large burning log onto Kaylee.  Somehow, she had the presence of mind to jump into the lake, and the kids put wet towels on her.  She was burned on her thigh, side and chin and sent to the hospital.  It looks like she will make a full recovery, minus some scarring.  We are keeping her in our prayers.

Then late to clinic for Lulu’s spinal tap and chemo, we were bumped back.  This meant we’d have to wait even longer before she could eat.  After a minimally dramatic port access, we waited for her blood work to come back.  An announcement came over the loudspeaker calling out a CODE BLUE on the H.O.T. unit.  Oh no.  I thought I recognized the room number.  Maybe it’s familiar because we were right next to Bo’s room last time?  That’s it, right?  I asked the nurses and doctors, realizing full well they couldn’t disclose information about another patient, and I was putting them in an awkward position.  I continued to ask anyway, hoping to see some glimmer of confirmation or denial in their eyes.  Let me tell you these guys would all make for great poker players; not a twitch or a tell to be found.  I texted his mom, but no response.  Must wait.

Lulu’s ANC was only 250, so there’s no way we were starting treatment that day, and probably shouldn’t have set up a play date and dance class for the week!  I practically threw a bagel at Lu, who started devouring it.  Sometimes it still seems strange to see her eat!  After exam, learning the new protocol to come, and getting prescriptions called in, we are told we can go, and come back Monday for treatment.

I knew I was on the visitor list for Bo, so I casually asked at the security desk which room he was in.  My fears were confirmed.  Shit.  He’s been moved to ICU.  We later get a text from his mom that he’s had a seizure and they are doing a cat scan.  They’ve found something in his brain, but have to do an MRI to find out what.  I can imagine the terror his mom and he is feeling.  I was praying he might be sleeping during all of it.  They have to wait to find out the results, and are hoping it’s not leukemia in his brain.  Oh, that waiting for MRI results … brings me back to when Lu was so sick when her appendix burst, but we didn’t know yet.  Waiting is absolute agony.  I got another text at almost 10:30 pm from Bo’s mom sharing the news that it’s a complication from his medications that cause extremely high blood pressure.  It may be reversible, and they are treating it.  We were relieved, but still concerned, and continue to send them as much strength as possible.

Most of you don’t know Bo personally.  But I share his story because I feel like he’s everyone’s child.  He has the kind of beautiful spirit that makes you feel like you know him, he reminds you of your own precious child, or the one you hope you have.  He’s kind, sweet, strong and loving.  These kids really are all of our children.  I used to think this stuff happened to other people.  How naïve, and how superior!  It really can be any of us, at any time.  We’re all in this together.  If this sounds a bit maudlin or preachy …  I can’t help but be moved to by this year and the events that continue to unfold.

Lulu was shaken up as well, and I wish I could protect her from this madness … and that I would have been better able to hide my own emotions.  We are careful about what we say, but these situations have become a part of our everyday lives.  She said she was praying for Bo, and worried about him.  She wants him to be able to go home soon.

We are still trying to put emotion into action and had another successful lemon-aid stand, this time at our church.  We raised $600 in 2 hours for children’s cancer research.  Thank you for those of you who donated online as well, that helped a lot!  Jazz Pharmaceuticals donated $1000 to the MACC clinic at Children’s on our behalf, for Lulu’s photo shoot.  Many of you are raising money in races, biking, walking, running, swimming, and we are so touched by your efforts, and proud that you wear LULU on your shirts as you race.

Thank you, also, to the wonderful doctors and nurses at Children’s.  I neglected to mention Lulu had a party at clinic on her last day of delayed intensification.  It was her official last day of shots, and Bonnie, along with the other nurses, made a huge sign for her with balloons, candy and presents to celebrate.  THANK YOU.  I’m continually impressed with the care and thought you all put into your jobs.  You are still by our side for every scream, every tantrum, every hug and every giggle.  I don’t know how you can deal with the love and the loss your jobs entail, but I am grateful to have you.  And humbled by the strength you have to keep on loving, despite the risks to your own hearts.

Thank you all for reading, acting and sharing your hearts with not only Lulu, but with all of the Kate’s, the Joshua’s and the Bo’s of the world . . .

Love,

a.l.l. of us

Lulu’s Ad

Lulu's Ad

Here it is! We are so proud of our little firecracker. Yes, she is Spirited indeed …

We are a bit in the weeds this week, but I will write asap! She’s doing pretty well, and we are all hanging in …
a.l.l. of us

Allowing Abundance in

Hi Friends,

Thanks for your patience; this week has been incredibly busy!  There’s so much good stuff happening that I’m trying to be conscious of allowing it in, not questioning it, or feeling overwhelmed by it.  After the year we’ve had, this is not an easy task.  I’ve been waiting for the other shoe to drop more than I’ve been allowing  abundance in!  Yet, that is what I aim to do.

I’ll start with no news is good news on Lulu.  She’s the squishiest, cutest and chubbiest she’s ever been, and a whopping 42 lbs. after this week of steroids!  She’s still craving foods like a pregnant woman in her third trimester, but to see her actually eat more than a couple of bites of something is just remarkable.  Her blood counts are next to nothing this week, so she is delayed for the last big-daddy round of chemo.  She might need a blood transfusion or platelets this week, but that feels like a mere pause at a pedestrian crossing compared to the sadistic marathon we’ve been on.  She’s feeling good, drawing rainbows and enjoying the summer!  I too, love summer so much; it makes me feel like a kid again.  Riding bikes, sitting on the porch, having water balloon fights in the backyard … it’s all so filled with life.  Max is excited too, although he’s melancholy over leaving his elementary school.  Well, he’s genuinely forlorn, actually.  But how amazing to love school so much at his age that he doesn’t want it to end?  I don’t recall having that same feeling … do you?

Realizing this will likely sound trivial, I must tell you that Lulu tied her own shoe for the first time.  I think parents with children who are life-threateningly ill subconsciously stop looking at things like comparison charts, growth charts, and expected milestones.  Every time I get one of those “Your Preschooler this Week” emails, I delete it instantly, for fear she may not meet some silly standard listed there.  Before treatment begins, the doctors give you a list miles long of the physical, mental and behavioral problems that can happen due to chemotherapy.  As you sign the documents declaring your understanding of the risks, you force your eyes to blur the words together on the page while holding your breath.  The normal expectations just don’t matter now; all that matters is that she’s healthy.  So, it took me by surprise when she tied that shoe, and how beautifully on par it was.  She was giddy with delight over her accomplishment and both Daddy and Mommy were there to share in that joy with her.

Things with the rest of us have been pretty good too.  After deciding not to work for these 7 months, the perfect opportunity seemed to land in my lap.  I’m doing some freelance consulting, mostly from home.  I could tell you more but then I’d have to shoot you, as I signed a non-disclose J.  Suffice it to say, I’ve had to wake up that fat lazy hamster who’s been couch-potatoin’ it up in my brain.  He didn’t get any warm-up either, just had to clear the cobwebs off his wheel and start sprinting baby!  He’s hanging in there though, after a little WD-40 and some unconditional love.   It’s been a little stressful, but also a welcome challenge, and I think good for Lulu to see me doing something that’s normal to her, too.  Jimmy’s work has thankfully been flowing in like a raging river, and he’s using all his great stamina to keep being the rockstar he is.  He’ll be travelling again very soon, which brings me to the good news that my dad is staying with us for a while!  We’re busy turning our bedroom-turned-closet back into a bedroom for him so he can have his own space.  We are all glad to have him here.

But wait, there’s MORE INCREDIBLE NEWS!  Lulu and we were chosen to do a photo shoot for an international drug company.  Apparently, quite a few caregivers from the hospital referred us to the company that makes one of the life-saving drugs Lulu is on.  This was a real compliment since they wanted a family who was still (mostly) thriving during this ordeal.  (We just found out the divorce rate for a family going through this is 70 percent!!!).  Ironically, the ad is for Erwinase, the drug I wrote about recently that requires shots in Lu’s legs.  They flew in a crew from L.A., and we did a photo shoot at the lakefront, and in our house (OMG, yes, we had to deep clean for that!)  We didn’t know how the day would go with Lu weaning off the effects of the steroids, and being a wee 5 years old.  Well, that little hambone tore it up!  The shoot was supposed to be 3 hours for two locations and ended up being 5.5 hours!  She was eating up every single minute, and you would have thought she’d been doing this for years.  The crew was amazing, kind, and absolutely fell in love with our little princess, hence the extra pictures.  Jimmy, Max, Grandpa and I ended up in some shots too, and had to sign releases.  Lulu told me how happy she was, and that she had “awlways, AWLWAYS” wanted to do something like this.  She had, in fact, been begging me to let her model before she was diagnosed, and I was considering giving in.  It was wonderful to see her celebrated, bald-headed and all, in this way.  Apparently, each person in each of their campaigns is given a word that describes them.  The word for Lulu: “Spirited”…  a perfect fit!  I’ll be sure to put the ad in the blog when it comes out.

So yes, we are allowing abundance in this week, or for however long it is here.  And I’m trying not to feel a sort of survivor’s guilt during this time.  Our friends Kate and Bo are still struggling and we think of them every day along with others at the hospital.  Kate has made huge improvements and is receiving mostly homecare now, but it’s still extremely difficult, and exhausting for her and her parents.  Bo has had some setbacks, but is in line for a bone marrow transplant now and luckily only had to endure one big round of chemo to knock his counts out before being eligible.  I know they’re happy when any of us are doing well, just as we are for them, so I hang on to that.  We go to visit the H.O.T. unit every chance we get, and are donating the proceeds from the photo shoot to that unit.  Please continue to keep all those kids in your thoughts and send them some good juju when you can.

Jimmy and I recently got to go on an impromptu afternoon date, on what was pretty much the perfect day.  As we drank a mojito, ate delicious food and sat in the sun, we felt so grateful.  Grateful for our family, and for you, our friends (even virtual).  Grateful for the beautiful day and the love that surrounds us.  Grateful for this moment in time, right here, right now.  Thank you for not forgetting us, even though life is full and time has marched on.  We welcome and appreciate your love … and abundance!

a.l.l of us